First Job? Protect Your Career By Asking the Right Questions

Stephanie Rodin - First Job? Protect Your Career By Asking the Right QuestionsPractitioners who are close to completing their residency or fellowship often have many questions about their first employment contract and the various clauses within it. I regularly provide educational seminars to residents and fellows at metropolitan hospitals in numerous specialty departments about what to expect when interviewing for that first job and what will be included in the written agreement.

Statistically, practitioners  do not stay with their initial employer for the entirety of their career. This is why it is so important to truly understand the terms of the employment contract. Here are three (3) main areas of concern and some questions to ask:

    1. Compensation Model: Is there a base salary or is the salary a percentage of the net collections or revenue? Additionally, is there a bonus structure or incentive plan to allow the practitioner to earn more?
    2. Benefits: What expenses will the employer cover, such as moving, CME/CDE, license and DEA fees? Does the employer provide an occurrence or claims-made malpractice policy?
    3. Restrictive Covenants: One of the most pertinent issues of the contract is the non-compete clause. The geographical restriction must be reasonable and the practitioner must be able to earn a living after he/she leaves the employment.

Depending on the language in this first employment agreement, it may impact the ability of the practitioner from moving on to the next step in their career.  

Only by asking the right questions will the practitioner be able to make an informed decision and accept a job that is  beneficial to both their present and future positions.

To learn more about this topic or to schedule a presentation, contact me at stephanie@rodinlegal.com.

Stephanie J. Rodin, Esq.Stephanie J. Rodin, Esq.
Rodin Legal, P.C.
Email: info@rodinlegal.com
Tel: (917) 345-8972
Fax: (917) 591-4428

This entry was posted in Employment Contracts, Law, Medical Practices and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s